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Posted by Trini Kid - - 0 comments

Sup Travellers?! The Australian government has serious laws in place in order to protect their beloved crocodiles. The laws were put in place in 1971 and it has led to giant increases in the population of crocodiles throughout Australia with as many as 100,000 occupying the Northern Territory alone according to Telegraph UK. But it seems like this increase has been causing some safety issues. People have been swimming in Australia's Kakadu National Park for tens of thousands of years but there has hardly been any instance of crocodile attacks until very recently.

The Telgraph reports that a teen who was swimming with a group of friends at Australia's Kakadu National Park on Sunday managed to escape a crocodile attack but the crocodile quickly went on to his 12 year old buddy and snatched him away. His death has yet to be confirmed but the chances of him escaping the crocodile are slim. If the 12 year old boy was indeed killed by the saltwater crocodile, it would mark the sixth time a saltwater crocodile has killed a child in the last 12 years. The search for the missing boy has begun. Based on the bite marks on the teen that escaped, the crocodile is believed to measure eight to nine feet so any crocodile measuring more than 6.5 feet can be shot. And so far, two have, though slicing them open revealed no human remains.


Many folks at the area are requesting that the population of crocodiles be culled and that the laws protecting them be examined. Justin O’Brien, chief executive officer of the Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation that represents the Mirarr Traditional Owners of the area, said the threat from crocodiles in Kakadu National Park, one of the Northern Territory’s most popular tourist destinations, must be urgently addressed. 

The chances of the 12 year old being found alive is very slim but still possible. Let's hold back the RIPs and let the parents hold on to the hope that their son is still alive. I think that this should be a warning to the Australian government to examine the laws protecting the crocs. How safe can a country be if there are a ton of bloodthirsty crocs all around? I'm no expert on wildlife but based on the pleas from people of the Northern Territory the idea is not to kill them out but to find a way to lessen the booming population. Anyway, my name is Trinikid and you've just been informed.