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Posted by Trini Kid - - 0 comments

I never believed that the world will meet doom on December 22nd 2012, but it seems that millions of people around have gone into some sort of panic or mild delusion about the whole concept. However it has now been fully disproved by archeologists that the world will no longer end on December 2012.

"Yes it is true!!! So no need to worry my friends, the world should continue spinning on in 2013 as per usual." Quote by Trinikid.

Now let's explain why and how it was disproved. It was reported that a group of professors from Boston University had discovered the oldest known Mayan Calendar in existence. It was discovered in a ruin room in Guatemala and it is said to be five centuries older than previous Mayan Calendars. "Wow!! How convenient."The text on the newly discovered Mayan calendar was said to be used by Mayan intellectuals for brainstorming and calculating. There were even sections that were plastered over which indicated that they were creating more space for text. "HMMMMM..Interesting"
New Mayan Findings

A group of numbers painted on the wall fully dissproves the common theory accepted by the world that the world will emd in 13 Baktuns or about 5000 years which works out to the end of 2012. The findings prove that the Mayan Calendar is not finite but rolls over like an odomoter. The findings contained a Mayan calendar that extends 17 baktuns over 7000 years.


"So in other words, the Mayan calendar does not end but is simply recycled. So imagine that you both a 1998 calendar in 1998 and you just used it for 14 years instead of buying a new one each year. So the world will not end at the end of your 1998 calendar but just is recycled for use in the future. No magic in that." Quote by Trinikid

"For me what’s really amazing is people are erasing and changing it and adapting it,” said Charles Golden, associate professor of anthroplogy at Brandeis University, who was not involved in the research. “You get these works in progress that really humanizes this, it kind of demystifies it.”